the other side: Quest for water

the other side

By Henryk Szubinski
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editorial previews

From School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-Scholarship and an underlying intellectual passion shape this volume. Andrews deliberately limits her scope to a discussion of myths based on “nonliving phenomena, such as wind, clouds, meteors, and tides.” The entries include “natural forces, gods and goddesses of natural forces, terms relating to the myths of natural forces, and broad geographical areas.” Many articles run one or two columns with the geographic ones generally longer. All of the entries are enlivened by a clear understanding of the importance of these myths to primitive cultures. Because of the specificity of this ready-reference resource, the article on the Aztec deity Quetzalcoatl, for instance, emphasizes his role as god of the sky rather than of wealth. Well-selected, black-and-white illustrations appear throughout. This volume includes a useful culture index, a lengthy subject index, and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources, as well as numerous cross-references. For cogent discussions of creation myths, aborigine dreamtime, or ancient calendars, send young people here.-Mary H. Cole, Polytechnic Preparatory Country Day School, NY

Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Andrews, a librarian specializing in “astronomical mythology,” has compiled an encyclopedia of nature myths, a broad topic to cover. She admits that most of her entries merely scratch the surface of existing scholarship, but this is, after all, an encyclopedia, and she has cross-referenced her entries and provided citations (though only at the end of each article) to an extensive bibliography. Her sources more than adequately cover the classics of the field but offer little research that is new or original. Innovative and useful indexes give intercultural, subject, and primary-source guides. Weaknesses include a dearth of pictures; the tone of the writing, which is a bit too conversational for an authoritative reference work; and entries (particularly those attempting to cover large areas such as North America, India, or Scandinavia) so general they tend to stereotype regional belief. Still, there are many entries here not easily found elsewhere, especially on minor deities and the myths of cultures not traditionally studied in depth (e.g., Agbe, a sea god of the Nigerian Dahomey; and Tupan, thunder god of the Brazilian Guarani). Recommended for larger public and academic libraries.?Katherine K. Koenig, Ellis Sch., Pittsburgh
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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BEYOND THE WAR BETWEEN WORLDS THERE IS A LEDGEND OF THE sea AS THE rival OF THE eARTH
THE EARTH OF the GROUND beneath our feet DIRT IS BEING CONCEPT DELETED…by dangers beyond reconing

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your SPIRIT guide will be PAUL BRUNTON a MEDIA philosopher and the inventor of MEDITATION as the BASIC BALANCE by IMAGE
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from a place far off the echoes of the old earth godessess is hear approaching with exo planets that harbour life and the promise of HABITABLE WORLDS BEYOND OUR OWN
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The great WATERY WORLDS of the universe EXO PLANETS

begin to outnumber the earthen concepts of early HUMAN history

There is a ledgend that the last known keeper of the secrets of the earth and its strength dies away with every age every civilisation
where the PHARAO DIED
and every basis of PYRAMIDS with their secret immortal keepers who pass through time unnoticed are nooone to be PROOVEN

the data is not there
Searches everywhere have given no true ledgend of the mastery of EARTH as the knowledge that remains
WHEN THE LAST of the knowledge of earth passess from KNOWING the last sounds of earth fade and the OTHER SIDE of the race betweeen the GODESSESS and the GODS of Earth fight out the battle between previous archane and old concepts with the OBVIOUS CONCLUSIONS of H2O and the basis of EARTH being alone or in greater numbers
this means survival
THIS TIME IS known as the END OF EARTH
as by NAME ONLY
no greater ledgend remains than one who dares keep the name of EARTH in a world in a universe where SLOWLY only water is being discovered

the basic deniability by DOORSAL complexity of the flight on the WINGS of fancy and the WILLIAM BLAKE as being beyond death, beyond the END and beyond to fake it and to see beyond into the watery worlds

the other side of water.
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William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of both the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form “what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language”.[1] His visual artistry has led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him “far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced”.[2] Although he lived in London his entire life except for three years spent in Felpham[3] he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as “the body of God”,[4] or “Human existence itself”.[5]
Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterised as part of both the Romantic movement and “Pre-Romantic”,[6] for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England, Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions,[7] as well as by such thinkers as Jakob Böhme and Emanuel Swedenborg.[8]
Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake’s work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th century scholar William Rossetti characterised Blake as a “glorious luminary,”[9] and as “a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors.”[10]
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