QUEST….relationalism and DREAMING AS WELL AS A.I

RELATIONALISM

ARTICLE by Henryk Szubinski.
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ON relationalism and the need for androids to have artificial memories programmed into their memory circuits as a basic relation to the RELATIONALISM of their world experience as a basic SCI FI presentation of some dreaming laws and their android laws as following special rules of dream constructs of the brain and the regular order of RELATIONALISM in basic surfaces lines and points
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there has been a gap in the relations of how much of civilisation has been spent while the new formats of technology has been spent
So that there is a basic GAP where the knowledge of robotics in the SCIFI future of robots being HUMAN and emotive as the shared REALITY of the 3 rd GAP
Meaning that the basis of REAL HUMAN Intelligence can be computed and the world of a NEAR REAL FUTURE AS BEING RELATED TO BY THE ENVIRONEMENTS that are active in such a reality by the 4th GAP ALTERATION INTO real interactions of a future where INTELLIEGNCE and TECHNOLOGY are as real as they can get

the world of RELATIONALISM

and the 4 laws of ANDROIDS

law 1 : the basis of all knowledge is shared by the future of law 2

law 2 : this is the future where knowledge is shared not by human future but by the android making its own future

law 3 : the future of law 3 can be a android or it can be human

law 4 : the basic knowledge gained in all of the laws will not assist in the definition of a futurised law.cannot be involved to improove relations between humans by relationalism of androids
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.basically a no GO for using androids to make you money
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If you feel like youre the most intelligent person on Earth and have the ability to discuss in any group environment on anything and are still the topic of terminology behind your back everytime you leave the disccusion and get the notion that it does not matter what is defined in relations to the EGO

It might be that youre a RELATIONALIST

a relationalist SPACE
or a dream where you spend your time arranging images photoes of anything in a desperate attempt to get it into order eventhough you might not be a part of thoose memories on the dreaming wall

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IT HURTS TO KNOW that everyone is while you also know; that is RELATIONALISM to the limit of perception beyond words ITS the basic human response at the end of the line whos tired but never gives up the future.
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meaning in short that whatever you say YOU JUST HAVE THAT AIR about you and the background of a FIGHTER whos made it through the THICK AND THIN and are still a long way from the definition most people give old WIZARDS in their time as being

“JUST AN OLD WIZAAAARD”

Youre still a RELATIONIST

basically a lot of opposed relationalism in SCI FI is based on the unknown SCENEbehind the BAR TALK and in the KITCHEN when the HUMAN PRESCENECE of a ability to do anything without problems is deemed as being JUST THE EVERYDAY TYPE

and the basis is usually because YOU ALREADY KNOW everything about your discussive counterpart SO THAT IN REALITY you feel you have not lost anything to the SPEAKER TAKING THE command of the discussion after its ended.
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.SOME STUFF from Blade runner comes to mind in the private BALCONY SCENE where Harrison FOrd takes a drink

Knowing the hoplessness of the situation but still knowledgable that hel get somewhere with a ANDROID.

who knows what a relation a relation is when its relation is made
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Relational Art or Relational Aesthetics is a mode or tendency in fine art … by which to analyse the often opaque and open-ended works of art of the 1990s. … of action within the existing real, whatever scale chosen by the artist.” …. Neo-impressionism · Divisionism · Pointillism · Cloisonnism · Les Nabis …

Relational Art or Relational Aesthetics is a mode or tendency in fine art practice originally observed and highlighted by French art critic Nicolas Bourriaud. Bourriaud defined the approach simply as, “a set of artistic practices which take as their theoretical and practical point of departure the whole of human relations and their social context, rather than an independent and private space.”[1


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ON A GENERAL SCALE OF A SURFACE TO STAND UP AGAINST WHILE YOU GO INTO RAPID EYE MOVEMENT WITH BLACK DOTS FOR EYELID CLOSURE BY FORCE AND THE EYE MUCLE RELEASE AS THE R.E.M LITE POINTS WILL BASICALLY WORK AS FAST AS POSSIBLE TO DEFINE THE MOST BASIC IMAGE; THE HUMAN SILUETTE AND THE TYPES OF STRESS AND DEFINE INTERACTIONS OF THE BODY IN THE HORIZONTAL TRYING TO GET THE VERTICAL IN LINE WITH THE TYPES OF INTERPRETATIONS THE HUMAN BRAIN WILL MAKE TO DEFINE ITSELF OR ITS BASIC CHARACTERISATIONS.
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iris opening and closure will define the basics of the human body going into hybernation mode everytime its functions save energy by a 10 % level of functioning of the type symbiosis of entering deep sleep
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Wherein the heart and the organs will fluctuate in a basic continuiim generated by visual iris symbiosis of a regulated opening and inverted levels of dimminished points giving the relationalism of depth in the dreaming world generated by images of energy saveing environments and their populated constructs defined by the pointism of energy or force conservations by points

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Origin of the term

One of the first attempts to analyze and categorize art from the 1990s[2], the idea of Relational Art[3] was developed by Nicolas Bourriaud in 1998 in his book Esthétique relationnelle (Relational Aesthetics).[4] The term was first used in 1996, in the catalogue for the exhibition Traffic curated by Bourriaud at CAPC musée d’art contemporain de Bordeaux.[5] Traffic included the artists that Bourriaud would continue to refer to throughout the 1990s, such as Henry Bond, Vanessa Beecroft, Maurizio Cattelan, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Liam Gillick, Christine Hil, Carsten Höller, Pierre Huyghe, Miltos Manetas, Philippe Parreno, Jorge Pardo and Rirkrit Tiravanija.[6][7][8][9]
[edit]Relational Aesthetics
Bourriaud wishes to approach art in a way that ceases “to take shelter behind Sixties art history” [10], and instead seeks to offer different criteria by which to analyse the often opaque and open-ended works of art of the 1990s. To achieve this, Bourriaud imports the language of the 1990s internet boom, using terminology such as user-friendliness, interactivity and DIY (do-it-yourself).[11] In his 2002 book Postproduction: Culture as Screenplay: How Art Reprograms the World, Bourriaud describes Relational Aesthetics as a book addressing works that take as their point of departure the changing mental space opened by the internet.[12]
[edit]Relational Art
Artists included by Bourriaud under the rubric of Relational Aesthetics include: Rirkrit Tiravanija, Philippe Parreno, Carsten Höller, Henry Bond, Douglas Gordon and Pierre Huyghe.[13]
Bourriaud explores this notion of relational aesthetics through examples of what he calls Relational Art. According to Bourriaud, Relational Art encompasses “a set of artistic practices which take as their theoretical and practical point of departure the whole of human relations and their social context, rather than an independent and private space.” [14]
The artwork creates a social environment in which people come together to participate in a shared activity. Bourriaud claims “the role of artworks is no longer to form imaginary and utopian realities, but to actually be ways of living and models of action within the existing real, whatever scale chosen by the artist.” [15]
In Relational Art, the audience is envisaged as a community. Rather than the artwork being an encounter between a viewer and an object, relational art produces intersubjective encounters. Through these encounters, meaning is elaborated collectively, rather than in the space of individual consumption [16].

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