bubbles of forces; FUTURE OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY DESIGN

BUBBLES of FORCES

By Henryk Szubinski

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.THE FUTURE OF SPACE TECHNOLOGY

. Speech balloons (also speech bubblesdialogue balloons, or word balloons) are a graphic convention used most commonly in comic booksstrips, and cartoons to allow words (and much less often, pictures) to be understood as representing the speech or thoughts of a given character in the comic. There is often a formal distinction between the balloon that indicates thoughts and the one that indicates words spoken aloud: the bubble that conveys subjective thoughts is often referred to as a thought balloon.

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File:Speech balloon 3 types.svg

The three most common speech balloons (top to bottom: speech, thought, scream).

on the closest approximates of the bubbles that surround a galaxy; surround planets as well as stars

The basic usage of a comic book talk bubble will define the values of a bubble as input into it into a basic equation of the involved values that will define the equations of such orders of

Gravity , rotations, warpings, spacetime, branes etc:

Drawings within the speech bubble

Singing characters usually have musical notes drawn into their word balloons. Archie Comics‘ Melody Valentine, a character in their Josie and the Pussycats comic, has musical notes drawn into her word balloons at all times, to convey that she speaks in a sing-song voice.

The above mentioned Albert Uderzo in the Asterix series decorates speech bubbles with beautiful flowers depicting an extremely soft, sweet voice (usually preceding a violent outburst by the same character).

A stormy cloud with a rough lightning sticking out of it, either in a bubble or just floating above the character’s head as a modified ‘cloudy’ thought bubble, depicts anger, not always verbally expressed.

Light bulbs are sometimes used when the character comes up with an idea or solution to a problem.

In the Western world, it is common to replace profanity with a string of nonsense symbols (&%$@*$#), sometimes called grawlixes. In comics that are usually addressed to children or teenagers, bad language is censored by replacing it with more or less elaborate drawings and expressionistic symbols. For example, instead of calling someone a swine, a pig is drawn in the speech bubble.

One example is the Spanish Mortadelo series, created by Francisco Ibáñez. Although not specifically addressed to children, Mortadelo was born during Francisco Franco‘s dictatorship, when censorship was the order of the day and the slightest attempt of rough language was prohibited. When Ibáñez’s characters are angry, donkey heads, lightning, lavatories, billy goats and even faux Japanese characters are often seen in their bubbles.

When Mortadelo was portrayed on film by Spanish director Javier Fesser in 2003, one of the critiques made to his otherwise successful adaptation was the character’s use of words that never appeared in the comics. Fesser claimed: “When you see a bubble speech containing a lightning falling on a pig, what do you imagine the character’s saying?”

 

SCI FI DESIGNS AND GRAPHIC DESIGN HAVE SOME BASIC SIMILARITIES

 

File:LexiconofComicana.jpg

 

in search of THE GRAPHIC REPRESENTATIONS OF VECTOR SCIENCE IN ASTROPHYSICS

 

 

 

 

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Agitrons
Wiggly lines around an object that is shaking
Blurgits, swalloops
Curved lines preceding or trailing after a character’s moving limbs
Briffits
Clouds of dust that hang in the spot where a swiftly departing character or object was previously standing.
Dites
Diagonal, straight lines drawn across something flat, clear, and reflective, such as windows and mirrors.
Emanata
Lines drawn around the head to indicate shock or surprise.
Grawlixes
Typographical symbols standing for profanities, which appear in dialogue balloons in the place of actual dialogue. [2]
Hites
Horizontal straight lines trailing after something moving with great speed, or indicating reflectivity (puddle, glass, mirror). Likewise, up-hites would be lines above an object falling.
Indotherm
Wavy, rising lines used to represent steam or heat on hot objects — however, the same shape found over a hot apple pie or something else strong smelling is a wafteron.
Lucaflect
A shiny spot on a surface of something
Plewds
Flying sweat droplets that appear around a character’s head when working hard or stressed.
Solrads
Radiating lines drawn from something luminous like a lightbulb or the sun.
Squeans
Little starbursts or circles that signify intoxication, dizziness, or sickness.
Vites
Vertical straight lines indicating reflectivity (compare dites, hites).

 

 

 

 

Other forms

The shape of a speech balloon can be used to convey further information. Common ones include the following:

  • Scream bubbles indicate a character is screaming or shouting, usually with a jagged outline or a thicker line which can be colored. Their lettering is usually larger or bolder than normal.
  • Broadcast bubbles (also known as radio bubbles) may have a jagged tail like the conventional drawing of a lightning flash and either a squared-off or jagged outline. Letters are sometimes italicised without also being bold. Broadcast bubbles indicate that the speaker is communicating through an electronic device, such as a radio or television, or is robotic.
  • Whisper bubbles are usually portrayed with a dashed (dotted) outline, smaller font or gray lettering, which indicates the tone is softer as most speech is printed in black. They indicate that the speaker is whispering.
    Another form, sometimes encountered in manga, looks like an occidental thought bubble.
  • Icicle bubbles have jagged “icicles” on the lower edge, representing “cold” hostility. Similarly the speech balloons of monsters may have an outline that suggests dripping blood or slime.
  • Colored bubbles convey the emotion that goes with the speech, such as red for anger or green for envy. This style is seldom used in modern comics.

 

 

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