type 1,2,3 PAD : subject matter : INTERVALS

COMPOSITE TYPE PAD FOR RELATED VALUES IN INTERACTION

By Henryk Szubinski

 

 

Europeiska flaggan

4freedooms

5th feedoom of knowledge moovement

Chordis6

the 7th framework Chordis7

 

THIS IS A example of a type relator to the values of specific videos and their content value interactions as shown here I did not think this would look like a SETI programme when i started out but the result was suprising nevertheless

Theese types of interactive pads can be varied and many

Basically the project Theeme was getting old and what happens when you start to forgett stuff:

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a type of composite made with the category INTERVALS on 4 sections of Youtube presentations so that the general contex of the definition of INTERVAL is defined on the pshysics definition as well as some basic emotive levels:

INTERACTION IS USED MOST WIDELY IN MEDIA AS A FORMAT OF RELATIONS BUT THE WHOLE FORMAT CAN BE A PAD TYPE

 

 

 

 

In mathematics, a (realinterval is a set of real numbers with the property that any number that lies between two numbers in the set is also included in the set. For example, the set of all numbers xsatisfying 0 \le x \le 1 is an interval which contains 0 and 1, as well as all numbers between them. Other examples of intervals are the set of all real numbers \R, the set of all negative real numbers, and the empty set.

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Real intervals play an important role in the theory of integration, because they are the simplest sets whose “size” or “measure” or “length” is easy to define. The concept of measure can then be extended to more complicated sets of real numbers, leading to the Borel measure and eventually to the Lebesgue measure.

Intervals are central to interval arithmetic, a general numerical computing technique that automatically provides guaranteed enclosures for arbitrary formulas, even in the presence of uncertainties, mathematical approximations, and arithmetic roundoff.

 

 

memory intervals

 

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Infinite endpoints

In both styles of notation, one may use an infinite endpoint to indicate that there is no bound in that direction. Specifically, one may use a=-\infty or b=+\infty (or both). For example, (0,+\infty) is the set of all positive real numbers, and (-\infty,+\infty) is the set of real numbers.

The notations [-\infty,b][-\infty,b)[a,+\infty], and (a,+\infty] are ambiguous. For authors who define intervals as subsets of the real numbers, those notations are either meaningless, or equivalent to the open variants. In the latter case, the interval comprising all real numbers is both open and closed, (-\infty,+\infty) = [-\infty,+\infty] = [-\infty,+\infty) = (-\infty,+\infty]

 

emotional intervals

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Multi-dimensional intervals

In many contexts, an n-dimensional interval is defined as a subset of \R^n that is the Cartesian product of n intervals, I = I_1\times I_2 \times \cdots \times I_n, one on each coordinate axis.

For n = 2, this generally defines a rectangle whose sides are parallel to the coordinate axes; for n = 3, it defines an axis-aligned rectangular box.

facet of such an interval I is the result of replacing any non-degenerate interval factor Ik by a degenerate interval consisting of a finite endpoint of Ik. The faces of I comprise I itself and all faces of its facets. The corners of I are the faces that consist of a single point of \R^n.

 

interval expansions

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